Friday, March 16, 2007

Kirsten Dunce

Kirsten Dunst on her brain:
I told Sam [Raimi, director] that we should do a 'Spider-Man 4' that's completely low budget--'Evil Dead' style--where Mary Jane has eight children with very little special effects and then we'll get a whole new audience, we'd make a lot of money because it wouldn't cost as much and everyone would go see it."

This isn't the first time she's suggested this.
Asked if she would love to see her Mary Jane character killed off in Spider-Man 3, Dunst laughs. "It would actually be really interesting if SPIDER-MAN died. Why doesn't the superhero ever die' I think if Mary Jane was alone, pregnant and he died, she could give birth to a spider baby and carry on the series with another young boy or something like that.

I guess that's why she's an actor and not a writer.

Of course, she can't really act, either.

Thursday, March 15, 2007

The Phantom of the Opera is there...inside your DS

I was taking a look at the news that the DS would be getting Opera in North America come June 4th, and I was wondering if I could turn it into a farcical, facetious, fabulous feature like I used to do. Originally, I started this blog with the intention of carrying over some of that here, but it doesn't really fit in, and I have no motivation to do so anyway. I believe I predicted the site would be back in March, which seems overly generous on my part.

So anyway, Nintendo is finally getting around to releasing Opera on the DS here in North America. Nintendo's greatest flaw recently is not being too "kiddy," but rather failing to capitalize on their own potential. The Mii stuff on the Wii has been a wild success, yet they could have done so much more with it. Japan has had Opera on the DS since April or so, and even Europe has had it since October. Why deprive such a lucrative market of something so readily appealing?

Nintendo is finally in a position to stomp on the throat of their competition, but they it seems they lack the killer instinct they once had. I'm not saying Sony would disappear, but I am saying Nintendo could really assert itself. The Wii and the DS really give Nintendo power, but they need to remember how to play with that power.



Only, you know, without R.O.B. I'm not saying all of Nintendo's innovations have been worthwhile (such as the e-reader), but the DS and Wii offer experiences not yet available with other consoles. It's no longer "Nintendo has some unique games but I want an XBox or PS2 because their versions of cross-console titles are better," it's "Nintendo has some unique games and their versions of cross-console titles are out of this world."



(I think this post has the most labels of any of my entries)

Hey man, we're lost in America

Lindsay Beyerstein:
Jeanne Sullivan didn’t get onto the liver transplant list immediately because she had neither insurance nor $500,000 spare dollars to cover the costs of the surgery. She couldn’t buy private insurance because of the pre-existing blood clotting disorder that eventually necessitated the transplant.

Jeanne didn’t qualify for public insurance because her partner Tommy, a self-employed contractor, made too much money for Jeanne to qualify for Medicaid. Tommy couldn’t buy private insurance for Jeanne because of the aforementioned pre-existing condition.

That reminds me of the Alice Cooper song "Lost in America," only, you know, not so rockin', especially because Jeanne Sullivan died.

Mariano Rivera answers some questions

Mostly useless, although one caught my eye:

People I would love to meet, past or present: "Definitely, I would love to have met Jesus Christ. That would be my No. 1. Jesus is first. I would tell him, 'What a job. What a job.' And I would have loved to meet Babe Ruth."

That makes me chuckle. It just seems like a funny thing to say to Jesus. "Good goin', champ!" Maybe Mo would give Jesus a congratulatory smack on the buttocks. "We couldn't have done it without you, Big J."

Monday, March 12, 2007

Back in the 8th spot

Tied 1-1 in overtime, Lundqvist stopped Carolina while Cullen and Jagr scored shootout goals to give the Rangers a victory over the tea, ahead of them, two points in the standings and another day resting in a playoff spot. Cullen also had the Rangers only goal during the game. Lundqvist once again looked good, bouncing back from a 2-3 loss to the Penguins.

In other hockey news, I took this screenshot earlier in the season. Sometimes to be a good athlete, you can't take shit from anyone:



Update March 12, 12:28 a.m.: Lundqvist was named player of the week or something -
FIRST STAR—HENRIK LUNDQVIST, G, NEW YORK RANGERS
Lundqvist posted a 3-0-1 record in four games with a 1.43 goals-against average and .948 save percentage as the Rangers (34-27-8, 76 points) moved into the eighth playoff spot in the Eastern Conference. Lundqvist posted consecutive victories over the New York Islanders, making 29 saves in a 2-1 home shootout victory March 5 and 30 stops in a 2-1 win at Long Island March 8. He made 20 saves in a 3-2 overtime loss at Pittsburgh March 10 and finished the week by stopping 30 of 31 shots and both shootout attempts in a 2-1 decision over Carolina March 11. Lundqvist is 8-2-4 in his past 14 games, recording a 1.65 GAA and a .935 save percentage in that span.

Sunday, March 11, 2007

I'm gonna take you by surprise, and make you realize, Amanda Hugginkiss

Brad Delp, lead singer for most of the rock band Boston's tenure, died the other day, possibly from rockin' too hard. Possibly not. I've decided to take the opportunity to chronicle some of Delp's biggest hits, including:

More Than a Feelin'



Don't Look Back



A Man I'll Never Be



Peace of Mind (Live '88)



Amanda (Live '04)



I'm sure Delp would have been as popular as Journey's Steve Perry or Foreigner's Lou Gramm had Boston guitarist Tom Scholz actually bothered to write more songs. Nevertheless, Boston remains a classic FM staple, much like Thin Lizzy, the Eagles, Led Zeppelin and other classic rock office equipment.

Update: It appears a caveman was drummer for Boston during the late 70s. Don't tell the Geico people.